Featured Pet: Mongo

Mongo 1Meet Mongo!  This precious boy had a pretty rough start to life.  At 3 weeks of age, he and his sister, Cleo, were brought in by our veterinary assistant, Autumn, in need of immediate care.  They were presented with matted eyes, weak and unable to eat on their own, but were nursed back to health.  At 3 months old, Mongo began vomiting and losing weight quickly.  Upon taking radiographs, he was diagnosed with an extremely rare congenital defect known as Persistent Right Aortic  Arch.  It is a condition that is caused by an abnormality of the heart’s blood vessels in which a ligament is wrapped around the esophagus which made him unable to pass solid food.  The only way Mongo 2Mongo had a chance at a normal life was a very risky surgery in which his chest would have to be opened, and the ligament cut away from the esophagus.  This surgery has only been performed a few times on cats.  After days of researching, Dr. Rick and Dr. Lori performed the very tedious procedure.  Now at 5 months old, Mongo is a happy healthy boy who loves to play and even more than that, he loves to eat!  He shares his home with 8 other kitties and 2 dogs.  He loves his car rides daily to work with his mommy and napping in front
of the fireplace.

Featured Pet: Wyatt

IMG_6661This month’s pet spotlight goes to a sweet little pit bull pup named Wyatt (Earp). Wyatt came to us as a very sick boy that suffered from diarrhea, lethargy and inappetance. After arriving for their appointment, the owners realized they could not properly care for his medical needs and surrendered him to one of our employees that agreed to take him in. After a few days of eating vet-recommended food, we realized that Wyatt was not gaining weight like he should and had also developed a light cough. Concerned that his health may be declining further, the doctors decided to do a blood panel in hopes that it may help shed some light onto his situation. The results showed that he was anemic and was not producing reticulocytes (immature red blood cells) which meant his bone marrow wasn’t working correctly. We immediately did a blood transfusion and sent samples to a lab for extra help in discovering the root cause in Wyatt’s condition. The results were back the next morning and were anything but expected: Canine Distemper. Unfortunately, distemper is a contagious and serious viral illness which can mimic a simple cold but then progresses to neurological signs including seizures. It can be fatal and there is no cure, however supportive care can be initiated with fluids and medications. Sadly, Wyatt’s illness worsened when the seizures started and his owner made the hard decision to humanely euthanize him. Through his sad story, we hope we can raise awareness about a disease that could effect your own companion if not properly vaccinated.

Featured Pet: Molly

molly-250px Good golly miss Molly! Our pet spotlight this month features a sweet little one-eyed Shih Tzu girl with tons of personality. Molly came to our clinic in May with a ruptured cornea in her right eye and a very worried mommy. Dr. Joe knew that removing Molly’s eye was best, but because of her history of heart problems, he also knew it would be a risk to put her under anesthesia. However, after several rounds of eye ointments and antibiotics, we realized that we would have to make the tough call to sedate and remove the eye in order to save her life. Under the watchful eyes of the doctors and techs, Molly did very well during her surgery and recovered better than we could’ve hoped. We at AHAH have all grown very attached to her and her sweet owner and continue to look forward to our visits with them.

Featured Pet: Buster

buster-2013Meet Buster! This hotrod came to us a few months ago when he wasn’t able to use his hind legs anymore, which is common for his breed when they have spinal disk disease. Our doctors used a few different therapies on him, but couldn’t seem to get any significant response. One day, our handy kennel staff member, Johnny, decided that he could make Buster a wheelchair that might aid in his ability to get around. Just a few days later Johnny had a handmade, personalized cart ready for Buster to try out. It took a few trails of milk-bones to get him to figure out how to move his feet around the wheels, but by the end of the second day he was rolling all over the clinic! We were so excited to call his daddy and tell him that he would be able to take his boy home sooner than expected and with his own set of wheels. Today we are happy to announce that Buster is actually using his hind legs on his own, thanks to the help of the cart which provided a therapeutic tool in his recovery.

Featured Pet: Shortie

shortie_crebsThis adorable little tripod is Shortie Crebs. Don’t let his small size fool you though…he is full of personality and spunk. Mr. Crebs came to us in early November with an injury to his front, right leg. Apparently this little guy found himself in the unfortunate situation of having a neighbor dog try to pull him through a fence, breaking his leg irreparably. After reviewing the case, Dr. Joe made the difficult decision to remove the leg instead of putting Shortie through multiple surgeries that may or may have ended in him being able to use it again. Through many months of in-house and at-home physical therapy, Shortie is doing extremely well; almost to the point that he’s forgotten he’s actually missing a leg! His owners report to us that he got hooked on a certain treat while he was recovering at home and now chases them around the house for it. We are very pleased with how far he has come and look forward to many more visits with the Crebs.